The Kiva Ladders Of Acoma Pueblo

Story behind it: Kiva ladders are decorative Pueblo ladders usually made of pine poles that have been hand scraped. The rungs of the pueblo ladder are notched to fit into the upright poles and rawhide lacing is used to lash each joint together in a cross patter. The ladder is narrower at the top than it is at the base which adds a dimension of hight. Other elements that look great with wooden ladders are Navajo blankets, Indian pottery and drums, wooden dough bowls and rustic lamps with rawhide lamp shades. Ladders can also be used to highlight special pattern you may like such as kokopelli or other village designs. The use of the kiva ladder as a display rack will further enhances the southwest theme in your room, add some additional colour and give the ladder a greater sense of purpose and function.

We’ve a huge range of stepladders in stock, including aluminium and fibreglass models for all trades. If you’re looking for step ladders for your home, we’ve got a great range too, including kitchen steps from Hailo. If you’re stuck and know what you want, but can’t find it, then give us a call today on the telephone number below.

We’d love to get your comments and feedback. We’ve answered many of your frequently asked questions here on our blog and hope they help you. If not tell us your question here or give us a call on 0330 123 1135 today.

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